The Salad Wars

Posted in Fall, Salad, Spring, Summer, Vegetable, Winter on Mar 20, 2010

045As I recently wrote about on our family blog, we’re having a bit of a shifting of the rules over here at Kid Vs. Produce. I’m realizing that barring an allergic reaction or some sort of other extreme aversion to a particular food, this whole “try it three times and then reject it forever” rule was pretty ill-conceived.  For some of our What The?  Foods or seasonal oddities, sure. But for the vegetables and fruits that we use frequently as part of our meals, I’m not willing to give him a pass just because he has turned his nose up at something three times.

I’ll be jotting down our amended rules in a bit – but for now?  It’s Salad Days, babies.

See this normal looking plate of food? Bread, cheese tortellini with marinara sauce, and a bagged Trader Joe’s Caesar salad. I figured I’d start small, and keep the kid-friendly items front and center. Croutons? Check! Shedded Parmesean? Check! Garlicky dressing? Check! Crunchy, mildly flavored lettuce? Check!

001

We made him shovel all of that lettuce down. MADE HIM. He performed his patented “Great White Shark” eating maneuver where he snags the bite off the fork, and then tosses his head back and to the side and sort of crunches around while making distressed growling noises about how disgusting it is, and how we are so mean, and how HE HATES LETTUCE and OMG BOO MOM YOU ARE SO MEAN!!!!1!!1!

004

The next night we had the infamous radicchio and butter lettuce salad with avocado and 10 different dressings to pique his interest. The night that had me stewing in a blue cloud of my own bad language and my husband suggesting that my son top his salad with unmentionable things. Hoo boy that was fun. You can see how fun it was by the photo at the top of the entry.

The thing is, I’m refusing to have kids who refuse salad. Whose Stubborn will rein supreme? (Hint: mine.)

Related Posts with Thumbnails

5 to “The Salad Wars”


  1. Rosa says:

    You must feel distressed LOL! What a sweet boy!

    That plate looks delicious and healthy! He is a lucky kid to get such healthy and tasty food!

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  2. ingrid says:

    LOL, good luck with that.

    In my house I’m the pickiest eater. My children aren’t though my youngest is the moodiest eater. Because of their love of trying new foods including veggies and fruits, I’ve gotten over a lot of my issues. I still don’t love everything but I am willing to cook and eat it.

    Btw, thanks for visiting my blog and commenting!
    ~ingrid
    ingrid´s last blog ..Only Because I said I would My ComLuv Profile

  3. Joanne says:

    Thanks so much for stopping by my blog! I really like your approach to getting your son to eat more veggies. I’m sure he’ll come around eventually. You’ve just gotta find a way to sneak them into foods that he already loves. And maybe one day he’ll start to crave broccoli. Maybe.

    The meal you prepared here looks great! Caesar salad is definitely a great jumping off point.

  4. Kristy says:

    I run a daycare and in one of my trainings they told me it takes a child an average of 12 times being introduced to a food before they will like it. That’s an average though. So some kids might eat anything, but others will need to try something 20 or 30 times before they get used to it. Good luck! Great blog!

  5. Lea Ann says:

    Thank you thank you thank you! My 9 year old son is much like yours. Last night I unveiled our own smackdown. I told him if your son could do, so could mine!



Leave a Reply

CommentLuv Enabled

  • You Avatar
  • Gnomeo Test

  • You’ll Eat It, and You’ll Like It, Mister.

    A
    Alfalfa Sprouts | Apples | Apricots | Artichokes | Arugula | Asian Pears | Asparagus

    B
    Bananas | Beans | Bean Sprouts | Beets | Belgian Endive | Bitter Melons | Blackberries | Black-eyed Peas | Blood Oranges | Blueberries | Bok Choy | Boniato | Boysenberries | Breadfruit | Broccoli | Brussels Sprouts | Burro Bananas

    C
    Cabbage | Calabaza | Cantaloupe | Carambola/Star Fruit | Carrots | Cauliflower | Celery | Chayote | Cherimoyas | Cherries | Chinese Cabbage | Chinese Long Beans | Collard Greens | Corn | Cranberries | Crane melon | Cucumbers

    D
    Daikon

    E
    Eggplant | English Cucumber | Escarole

    F
    Feijoas | Fennel | Figs | Flowering Kale/Salad Savoy

    G
    Green Garlic | Garlic | Ginger Root | Grapefruit | Grapes | Guavas

    H
    Heirloom tomatoes | Herbs | Honeydew | Horned Melon/Kiwano

    J
    Japanese Cucumbers | Jicama

    K
    Kale | Kiwifruit | Kohlrabi | Kumquats

    L
    Leeks | Lemons | Lettuce, Iceberg | Lettuce, Leaf | Lettuce, Romaine | Limes

    M
    Malanga | Mamey Sapotes | Mango | Melons | Mushrooms | Micro-greens

    N
    Nectarines

    O
    Okra | Onions, Dry | Onions, Green | Oranges

    P
    Papaya | Passion Fruit | Peaches | Pearl Onions | Pears | Pepino Melons | Peppers, Bell | Pepper, Chili | Persian Melons | Persimmons | Pineapple | Plantains | Plums | Pomegranate | Potatoes | Prickly/Cactus Pears | Pumpkins | Pummelos

    R
    Radicchio | Radishes | Rapini/Broccoli Raab | Raspberries | Red Bananas | Rhubarb

    S
    Salsify | Sapotes | Shallots | Snap peas | Snow Peas | Spinach | Squash | Strawberries | Summer Squash | Sunchokes | Sun-Dried Tomatoes | Sweet Potatoes | Swiss Chard

    T
    Tamarillos | Tamarindos | Taro Root | Tomatillos | Tomatoes | Turnips

    W
    Watercress | Watermelon | Winter Squash

    Z
    Zucchini